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Game Maker 7.0 PRO


However old are you lot? Twelve? Thirteen?You certainly use logic and language like a bunch of pre-pubescent, under educated retards.Here you are bragging of your ability to crack software and yet are so poor at coding that you need to use Gamemaker to produce something real. At the same time many of you seem unable to construct simple sentences without spelling and gramatical errors that would suggest you are incapable of carrying out anything but the most menial, manual jobs. Perhaps that explains your inability to find the measly $20 to pay for a licensed copy of GM7.By the way, having got your illegal copies of the software have any of you managed to produce anything with it, or have you just fiddled about with it before giving up? The standard of discussion suggests that you are unlikely to have what it takes to be producers rather than a parasites.




Game maker 7.0 PRO


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lol ahahahaha this is hilarious! imao! at my school we use game maker for our game development class, and i waas looking for a pro edition i could use at home. i found this page and now imao! jesusluvsu, u rule!


GameMaker (originally Animo, Game Maker (until 2011) and GameMaker Studio) is a series of cross-platform game engines created by Mark Overmars in 1999 and developed by YoYo Games since 2007. The latest iteration of GameMaker released in 2022.


GameMaker accommodates the creation of cross-platform and multi-genre video games using a custom drag-and-drop visual programming language or a scripting language known as Game Maker Language, which can be used to develop more advanced games that could not be created just by using the visual programming features. GameMaker was originally designed to allow novice computer programmers to be able to make computer games without much programming knowledge by use of these actions. Recent versions of software also focus on appealing to advanced developers.[1]


GameMaker is primarily intended for making games with 2D graphics, allowing out-of-box use of raster graphics, vector graphics (via SWF),[2] and 2D skeletal animations (via Esoteric Software's Spine)[3][4] along with a large standard library for drawing graphics and 2D primitives.[5] While the software allows for limited use of 3D graphics, this is in form of vertex buffer[6] and matrix functions, and as such not intended for novice users.


The engine's primary element is an IDE with built-in editors for raster graphics, level design, scripting, paths, and shaders (GLSL or HLSL).[7] Additional functionality can be implemented in software's scripting language or platform-specific native extensions.[8] In GameMaker Studio 2, you can choose whether to export the game as an NSIS installer, or a .zip file containing the game, the data.win file, and any files added under the "Included Files" tab in the editor.[9]


Versions 5.0 and below have been freeware; version 5.1 introduced an optional registration fee; version 5.3 (January 2004) introduced a number of new features for registered users, including particle systems, networking, and possibility to extend games using DLLs.[34]


The program currently holds a rating of 8.5/10 on Mod DB based on 223 user reviews; many cite its flexibility and ease of use as positives and instability, crashes, project corruption and outdated features as negatives.[59] Douglas Clements of Indie Game Magazine wrote that the program "[s]implifies and streamlines game development" and is "easy for beginners yet powerful enough to grow as you develop", though noting that "resource objects have to be gathered if unable to create" and that licensing between Steam and the YoYo Games website is "convoluted".[60]


Also known as the game lab, this space is central to the gaming work at KSU. The lab consists of 31 workstations with 24" displays and running Win7, each connected to an XBox360 for development/play. This lab also contains Wii, XBox360, and PS3 consoles connected to two 46" plasma screens.


Star Wars: Avian Hunt is a turn-based strategy/3D flight combat simulator game created by C3PO the Dragon Slayer on the Pro Edition of Game Maker 7. The game, which follows the story of the pirate league known as the 1337 N00B5, will be played mostly as a strategy game, building forces and commanding units, until opposing units clash, and the game puts the player behind the controls of the cockpit as they dogfight.


Avian Hunt first started after production on CUSWSS II was halted, and C3PO the Dragon Slayer expressed interest in creating a Star Wars game that allowed the player to be more creative in his approach to winning. Eventually, after weeks of planning, the gameplay was decided to be based loosely on that of Star Fox Command, a turn-based strategy game for the Nintendo DS that had a player control a fighter whenever a member of that player's team would collide with an enemy squadron. (There are significant differences between Avian Hunt and Star Fox Command, however. Instead of the Move phase for both factions being conducted simultaneously, they're conducted during their respective player's turns. Also, both sides, computer and player, have more equitable forces.)


For much of August 2007, C3PO the Dragon Slayer worked on drafting the basic story and gameplay for the game. The title was decided on Avian Hunt, as the story followed a gang's quest to find Vergere, an avian Jedi-turned-Sith who had left with the Yuuzhan Vong several decades before they invade the galaxy. Soon afterwards, C3PO the Dragon Slayer started building the strategy engine, rendered in 2D, to begin technical production of the game.


After a rough idea of the strategy engine was presentable, C3PO the Dragon Slayer started to work on modeling 3D objects for the flight shooter. After researching a wide variety of modeling programs, it was decided that Blender best suited Avian Hunt. Up through much of January 2008, C3PO the Dragon Slayer worked to model the many starfighters and ships that were to appear in the game. As all this was going on, C3PO the Dragon Slayer was also beginning of the script for the game.


Once the models were finished and textured, C3PO the Dragon Slayer started to create the first demo, which featured purely a 3D flight simulator in the vacuum of space. This demo was released on yoyogames.com on May 29, 2008.


Over summer 2008, most of production focused on switching from Game Maker's d3d functions to Ultimate 3D, an extension for Game Maker that uses a DLL. By December 2008, a second demo was completed, which featured mouse controls, random terrain, collision detection, and enemies to shoot. This demo has not yet been released on yoyogames.com because the site's virus scanner repeatedly rejected the file.


Sometime after the failed attempts at uploading the second demo to Yoyogames.com, C3PO the Dragon Slayer started creating an original game, Star Wars: Ace and Commander, which was to be a "faux-Avian Hunt" that would help practice programming AI and other critical facets for Avian Hunt. Ace and Commander was released in August 2009, and continues to be updated bi-weekly. C3PO plans to finish Ace and Commander by adding a campaign mode and porting major components of the engine to Avian Hunt, which will make continued progress on Avian Hunt much easier. Though a comprehensive timeframe has not yet been developed, Ace and Commander will likely be finished around December 2009, at which point production on Avian Hunt will redouble.


Most images for the game were developed independently, especially for the 2D versions. C3PO the Dragon Slayer used several different programs to make these sprites, including Game Maker's internal sprite editor, Microsoft Paint, and the GNU Image Manipulation Program. In addition, the character portraits were made using this online Portrait Illustration Maker.


Several ships appear in the game that were designed by I really love yoda. These include the Invictus-class Star Destroyer and the Improbus, as well as all of the Chiss designs. In addition, I really love yoda created designs for several bases to appear in the game, including the 1337 N00B5 space stations.


Though the game is a serious contribution to the Star Wars universe, and is intended to fit with canon, there are several jokes and homages. The most obvious is the inclusion of 1337, a real-world "language" used by hackers and MMORPG players. This was justified by the use of the word "noob" in the Star Wars: Legacy comics. The usage of 1337 in the game both serves as comic relief and an artistic representation of the contrast between the "elite" and the lower classes, where the roles are ironically reversed.


The game pays heavy homage to the game Star Fox 64. The gameplay of turn-based strategy turning into a flight shooter was inspired partly by Star Fox Command, and many lines that are famous from Star Fox 64 appear as Easter eggs in the randomly-generated battle chatter. A famous gameplay mechanic borrowed from Star Fox is the barrel roll, which deflects enemy fire. The line, "Do a barrel roll!" has become an internet meme, and appears in several variations in Avian Hunt several times. In addition, there is a cheat code to unlock an Arwing, the ship used in the Star Fox series.


Star Wars: Ace and Commander is a 2D starfighter game created by C3PO the Dragon Slayer using Game Maker 7.0 Pro. It was created to practice programming computer artificial intelligence (AI) before the AI was created in the 3D Avian Hunt. In the game, a player controls a starfighter and must assist his squadron to defeat the enemy starfighters and capital ships. Two modes of gameplay exist: Skirmish mode, where a player creates two squadrons of ships and plays as a fighter in one of the factions and participates in a battle between them, and Survival mode, where a player must fight wave after wave of progressively stronger enemies.


Though a story has not yet been added to the game, the basic premise of the game is the adventure of Ace Squadron, a starfighter unit created shortly after the Battle of Yavin. During the tutorial, a nameless instructor guides a new Rebel recruit in a Z-95 Headhunter. The starting ships available for Survival mode are the X-wing, the Y-wing, and the Z-95 Headhunter, and the announcer during Survival mode is a figure named "General Morgan." 350c69d7ab


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